"

Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc.

We gladly feast on those who would subdue us.

"

Addams Family Credo (via creepygross)

Coolest.  Motto.  Ever.

(via sonneillonv) Very bacchante. Very Titus Andronicus. (via ginandjack) Very me.

(via ginandjack)

(Source: mattymatte, via ginandjack)

ginandjack:

cafiamo:

Baco with palm tree in the backgroung, Porto, Portugal

Love the huge grin! Often how i see Him.

ginandjack:

cafiamo:

Baco with palm tree in the backgroung, Porto, Portugal

Love the huge grin! Often how i see Him.

(via lonelyspelltoconjureyou)

DOITGIRL: ARIADNE was the immortal wife of the wine-god Dionysos. There were...

dailydoitgirl:

ARIADNE was the immortal wife of the wine-god Dionysos. There were several versions of her story. In one, Ariadne, the daughter of King Minos of Krete, assisted Theseus in his quest to slay the Minotaur, and then fled with him aboard his ship. However, when they landed on the island of…

Anonymous asked: What does Ariadne look like?

(Source: gaspard-rising)

Anonymous asked: Did maenads really kill people/animals?

What do you think? 

[[Gaspard Ulliel chosen for my faceclaim.]]

[[Thank you for the lovely list of suggestions, achangingaltar!]]

(Source: aim-for-yourself)

jenniedavis:

A Young Couple (Bacchus and Ariadne), c. 1505
Tullio Lombardo

jenniedavis:

A Young Couple (Bacchus and Ariadne), c. 1505

Tullio Lombardo

(via wheredionysosdwells)

unexplainedcinema:

Unknown dancers, 1925.

unexplainedcinema:

Unknown dancers, 1925.

(via wheredionysosdwells)

divinejewel:

“Altar of Dionysus” by Gustav Klimt, 1886–1888

divinejewel:

“Altar of Dionysus” by Gustav Klimt, 1886–1888

(Source: sabrinadivina, via wheredionysosdwells)

necspenecmetu:

Eustache La Sueur, Bacchus Crowning Ariadne with Stars, 1630-1


 
 
She deserves them. [And more.]

necspenecmetu:

Eustache La Sueur, Bacchus Crowning Ariadne with Stars, 1630-1

She deserves them. [And more.]

(via wheredionysosdwells)

(Source: old-world, via lonelyspelltoconjureyou)

lonelyspelltoconjureyou:

“Singing and dancing, man expresses himself as a member of a higher unity…The man is no longer an artist. He has become a work of art…and the cry of the Eleusianian mysteries rings out to the chisel blows of the Dionysian world artist: “Do you fall down, you millions? World, do you have a sense of your creator?”
- Friedrich Nietzsche, Prose Hymn to Dionysus from The Birth of Tragedy, 1872

lonelyspelltoconjureyou:

“Singing and dancing, man expresses himself as a member of a higher unity…The man is no longer an artist. He has become a work of art…and the cry of the Eleusianian mysteries rings out to the chisel blows of the Dionysian world artist: “Do you fall down, you millions? World, do you have a sense of your creator?”

- Friedrich Nietzsche, Prose Hymn to Dionysus from The Birth of Tragedy, 1872

(Source: wyrdmorrish)